robcam-wfu
There are sins or (let us call them as the world calls them) evil memories which are hidden away by man in the darkest places of the heart but they abide there and wait. He may suffer their memory to grow dim, let them be as though they had not been and all but persuade himself that they were not or at least were otherwise. Yet a chance word will call them forth suddenly and they will rise up to confront him in the most various circumstances, a vision or a dream, or while timbrel and harp soothe his senses or amid the cool silver tranquility of the evening or at the feast at midnight when he is now filled with wine. Not to insult over him will the vision come as over one that lies under her wrath, not for vengeance to cut off from the living but shrouded in the piteous vesture of the past, silent, remote, reproachful.
James Joyce, Ulysses (via robcam-wfu)
bluebed

bluebed:

So I designed & illustrated the Centennial Edition of James Joyce’s “Dubliners" for Penguin Classics.

Early on I decided against writing any blurbs & bios, instead I wanted to approximate Joyce’s techniques in visual arrangement, medium and form. I started with an infinite crowd frozen between movement and paralysis, for the back cover I played with various links between the stories and designed the flappy layout accordingly: it opens with the beginning of “The Sisters” and closes with the ending of “The Dead,” at which point you dear reader should be in tears.

"Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and anger."

I remember being lulled by the narrowing sweeps of the book’s final passages and feeling that the 27 slowly sailing through the tenderloin is no longer the same 27, not sure how, just the vague sensation of a translucent film newly pasted between the vision and the brain, ineluctable modality et all. Joyce’s imagery is already complete in its universality and exactitude making any attempt at illustration pointless by default and no, I’m not just dissing myself, I only wanted to put a link to these brilliant Joyce covers by Peter Mendelsund.

Great big thanks to Paul Buckley (his Penguin 75 is a must-read) for the assignment and for allowing me to do the entire design, I’m deeply honored to be in the company of all my cartooning heroes: Seth, Sammy Harkham, Ivan Brunetti, Jason and many others. In fact I think I’m the only one in that company who doesn’t have a book. Yet.

pbsthisdayinhistory
pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 8, 1918: Ernest Hemingway is Wounded in WWI

On this day in 1918, 18-year-old Ernest Hemingway was severely wounded while serving as a Red Cross ambulance driver on the Italian front during WWI. Despite his own injury, he was able to save a nearby companion, an act for which he received the Italian Medal of Honor.

Hemingway recovered in Milan over the next several months before returning to the United States. He later incorporated his war experiences into his critically acclaimed 1929 novel, A Farewell to Arms.
Learn more about Ernest Hemingway’s life and works with American Masters’ “The American Novel” timeline.
Photo: Ernest Hemingway recuperates from wounds at ARC Hospital, Milan, Italy, September 1918. (Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston).

pbsthisdayinhistory:

July 8, 1918: Ernest Hemingway is Wounded in WWI

On this day in 1918, 18-year-old Ernest Hemingway was severely wounded while serving as a Red Cross ambulance driver on the Italian front during WWI. Despite his own injury, he was able to save a nearby companion, an act for which he received the Italian Medal of Honor.

Hemingway recovered in Milan over the next several months before returning to the United States. He later incorporated his war experiences into his critically acclaimed 1929 novel, A Farewell to Arms.

Learn more about Ernest Hemingway’s life and works with American Masters’ “The American Novel” timeline.

Photo: Ernest Hemingway recuperates from wounds at ARC Hospital, Milan, Italy, September 1918. (Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston).

tinyvolcano
I learned this, at least, by my experiment: that if one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours. He will put some things behind, will pass an invisible boundary; new, universal, and more liberal laws will begin to establish themselves around and within him; or the old laws be expanded, and interpreted in his favor in a more liberal sense, and he will live with the license of a higher order of beings. In proportion as he simplifies his life, the laws of the universe will appear less complex, and solitude will not be solitude, nor poverty poverty, nor weakness weakness. If you have built castles in the air, your work need not be lost; that is where they should be. Now put the foundations under them.
Henry David Thoreau, Walden (via tinyvolcano)