victoriousvocabulary
victoriousvocabulary:

WORRICOW
[noun]
1. scarecrow; an object made to resemble a human figure, set up to scare birds away from a field where crops are growing.
2. hobgoblin; bugaboo; devil.
3. a frightening-looking person.
Etymology: from worry (Middle English weryen, werwen, wyrwyn, “to strangle, bite, harass”, Old English wyrgan, “to strangle”; cognate with German würgen) + cow (Old Scots for “goblin”).
[Michael Kutsche]

victoriousvocabulary:

WORRICOW

[noun]

1. scarecrow; an object made to resemble a human figure, set up to scare birds away from a field where crops are growing.

2. hobgoblin; bugaboo; devil.

3. a frightening-looking person.

Etymology: from worry (Middle English weryen, werwen, wyrwyn, “to strangle, bite, harass”, Old English wyrgan, “to strangle”; cognate with German würgen) + cow (Old Scots for “goblin”).

[Michael Kutsche]

thetinhouse
thetinhouse:

Motivational Monday Mornings! "When I am working on a book or a story I write every morning as soon after first light as possible. There is no one to disturb you and it is cool or cold and you come to your work and warm as you write. You read what you have written and, as you always stop when you know what is going to happen next, you go on from there. You write until you come to a place where you still have your juice and know what will happen next and you stop and try to live through until the next day when you hit it again." — Ernest Hemingway

thetinhouse:

Motivational Monday Mornings! 

"When I am working on a book or a story I write every morning as soon after first light as possible. There is no one to disturb you and it is cool or cold and you come to your work and warm as you write. You read what you have written and, as you always stop when you know what is going to happen next, you go on from there. You write until you come to a place where you still have your juice and know what will happen next and you stop and try to live through until the next day when you hit it again." — Ernest Hemingway

apoetreflects
apoetreflects:

“As a poet I hold the most archaic values on earth … the fertility of the soil, the magic of animals, the power-vision in solitude, the terrifying initiation and rebirth, the love and ecstasy of the dance, the common work of the tribe. I try to hold both history and the wilderness in mind, that my poems may approach the true measure of things and stand against the unbalance and ignorance of our times.”
—Gary Snyder
 

apoetreflects:

“As a poet I hold the most archaic values on earth … the fertility of the soil, the magic of animals, the power-vision in solitude, the terrifying initiation and rebirth, the love and ecstasy of the dance, the common work of the tribe. I try to hold both history and the wilderness in mind, that my poems may approach the true measure of things and stand against the unbalance and ignorance of our times.”

—Gary Snyder